Introduction

I recently received a scholarship from a nonprofit organisation. The money helps cover some of my college expenses, but I’m still not sure how to spend the rest. What can I do with this money?

It can go toward the cost of attending the school, such as tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies.

  • Tuition and fees: The cost of tuition and fees directly correlates with the amount you receive in your scholarship. You should find out if there are any extra costs that might not be covered by your scholarship, such as rent and utilities for on-campus housing or parking passes.
  • Books and supplies: Your financial aid office may also be able to help you with this expense, but you’ll want to know what books are mandatory for each class before requesting assistance.
  • Transportation costs: If your school doesn’t offer transportation options at no cost to students, don’t fret! You can always use public transportation (a bus pass) or a carpool service—this way, even if you do have some money left over after paying the bills above, it won’t just sit in an account collecting dust while you wait until next quarter’s loan payments start coming due again.
  • Miscellaneous school-related expenses like technology needed for classes or finding work off campus after graduation (laptop/computer breaks down), unusual class requiring specific software/hardware that isn’t provided by the university).

You can use it for transportation costs associated with getting back and forth from your home to campus.

You can use it for transportation costs associated with getting back and forth from your home to campus.

If you don’t have a car and live in an urban area, this may be the most practical option for you. If you do have a car, but need to get gas or take care of maintenance on it, this is also an option. You could also use it if you don’t have enough money to pay for public transportation or want access to reliable transportation while attending college full-time or part-time.

In addition to these options, there are some special circumstances where a scholarship will cover the cost of owning a vehicle:

  • You’ve been awarded an ROTC scholarship that requires active duty military service after graduation;
  • You’re disabled and require special equipment that cannot fit into accessible public transportation vehicles; or
  • A life-changing event has occurred (such as death in the family) and this will allow you more flexibility in finding employment opportunities while completing schoolwork

You can use it for miscellaneous school-related expenses, including technology that you need for classes or to find a job off campus.

With a scholarship, you may be able to use the money for miscellaneous school-related expenses, including technology that you need for classes or to find a job off campus. For example, the loan might help with purchasing a laptop or software you need for your major program. It could also be used toward paying internet access fees or other technological expenses like printer ink cartridges and building access cards.

The funds may also be used toward transportation costs associated with getting back and forth from home to campus—or even getting yourself there in the first place!

You may use it toward expenses if you need to get a laptop or if your existing computer breaks down.

You may use it toward expenses if you need to get a laptop or if your existing computer breaks down. Consider how much you spend on technology each year and plan for ways to cut those costs by using free software, borrowing from friends, or buying used items. You might also consider getting a job or working part-time so that you can buy all of the things that you need and want without depending on scholarships.

If you’re taking an unusual class that requires supplies outside of what is provided by the educational institution, these scholarships may help you pay for the additional materials.

If a class requires any of these extra materials, you might be able to use scholarship money for them.

  • Computers: This can include laptops, desktops, tablets or other devices that are required by your college or university.
  • Books: If the school provides books for classes but not enough to get through the term (or if they don’t provide physical books at all), there are scholarships available specifically for textbook purchases.
  • Laptops: If there is an additional cost associated with having a laptop during class time that isn’t covered by tuition or another scholarship, this money could help cover those costs as well.

If you’re using scholarship money to offset some of the costs of college, you will have fewer student loans to worry about when you graduate.

If you’re using scholarship money to offset some of the costs of college, you will have fewer student loans to worry about when you graduate. Money that could have gone towards loans can now go towards paying for your living expenses. When selecting a scholarship program, look for one that pays for at least some of your living expenses so that there’s no gap between what your parents can pay and what the school requires from students.

If you are using scholarship money solely as a tool for paying down debt, consider applying for scholarships with low application fees or no application fee at all. That way, more of the money granted by these awards will actually go toward reducing debt rather than being wasted on processing fees and other administrative costs associated with applying for scholarships.

As long as your scholarship is applied toward your educational expenses, it’s fine to use the money for a variety of purposes.

As long as your scholarship is applied toward your educational expenses, it’s fine to use the money for a variety of purposes. Scholarships are not loans and do not have to be repaid.

They can be used for tuition, room and board, books and supplies, study abroad programs—anything that helps you complete your education. Award-winning students might even receive a full scholarship covering all of their educational costs!

Scholarships are generally awarded based on merit: whether or not you meet the qualifications set forth by the donor organization that awards them. In addition to academic excellence (GPA), they often take into consideration extracurricular activities or other factors such as race or gender when choosing recipients; therefore earning one may require some effort on your part by applying through multiple channels (both traditional ones like FAFSA forms/FAFSA2Go as well as creative social media campaigns).

Conclusion

Ultimately, it’s up to you how you spend your scholarship money. If you have questions about whether a particular expense is allowable under the terms of your award letter, ask the financial aid office or contact your scholarship provider directly.

Comments are closed.